SERUM SIALIC ACID IN RELATION TO ERYTHROCYTE SEDIMENTATION RATE AND HbA OF TYPE 2 DIABETIC PATIENTS

ABSTRACT

Background : Accumulating evidence suggests that type 2 diabetes is associated with chronic low grade inflammation. Serum sialic acid (SSA) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are the markers for inflammation.
Aims : The main aim of this study was to determine the serum sialic acid level in type 2 diabetic patients and study its relationship with ESRandHbA .
Settings & design : This was a case control study in which type 2 diabetes patients were considered as cases and
healthy individuals were taken as controls.
TMethods & Material : The study included totally 122 subjects of whom 51were healthy individuals, 71were of type 2 diabetes. Samples were analyzed for HbA , ESR, Sialic acid and glucose using Ion exchange HPLC,Westergrens method, Aminoff method and GOD POD method respectively.
Statistical analysis : The data were analyzed using the ‘R’ software. Resultswere expressed asmean ± SD. Spearman’s
correlation test was used for correlation studies.
Results : Serum sialic acid concentrations, ESR and HbA were significantly increased in type 2 diabetics. Sialic acid had significant positive correlation with ESR in diabetic patients as well as the controls. Sialic acid had no
correlation with glucose andHbA.
Conclusion : The markers of inflammation ESR and SSAare increased in type 2 Diabetes mellitus and can be used to monitor the subclinical inflammatory process in them.

Physiology of glycosylated haemoglobin, and the impact of glycaemic control on lipid profile in adult men

ABSTRACT

Looking at the effects of insulin deficiency on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, diabetes mellitus is now being called more a disease of lipid metabolism than carbohydrate metabolism. A cross-sectional study was conducted during March 2005 to March 2006 to study the glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and lipid levels in normal adults and with type -2 diabetes mellitus and its
relation to glycaemic control. Comparison of  lipid levels was made between group of diabetic patients and the normals. The lipid fractions i.e.Total cholesterol, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein levels of poorly controlled diabetic (HbA1c > 8 %), were respectively higher (p<0.001), (p<0.01) and (p<0.001) than those of the control group. Later the lipid levels decreased drastically with glycaemic control (p>0.05, p>0.05 and p<0.05 respectively). Increased levels of low-density lipoprotein may be a contributory factor to the high risk of atherosclerosis induced coronary artery disease observed in diabetes mellitus patients. Reduction of blood glucose levels is likely to reduce low density lipoprotein levels and the  risk of complication, with the lowest risk being in
those with glycosylated hemoglobin values in the normal range i.e. less than 8.0%.